Find the word definition

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English


cot death
▪ The New Zealand cot death study was a nationwide case-control study carried out from 1 November 1987 to 31 October 1990.
▪ The royalties go to Birthright; let's hope they find a way to prevent tragic cot deaths.
▪ Although the number of cot deaths is now falling, three babies still die unaccountably each day in the United Kingdom.
▪ The results of this study suggest that the incidence of cot death can be reduced.
▪ The family had a history of cot deaths, and the baby had a heart condition.
▪ The specimens resulted from therapeutic abortions, miscarriages, and cot deaths.
▪ He appears to have removed entire systems of organs from cot death children, but most were never used in research.
▪ Her son had been stabbed twice through the back with a carving knife, as he lay in his cot.
▪ Her cellmate said nothing as she lay motionless on her cot, staring at the ceiling.
▪ Two-year-old Bethany Hudson's alarm started to smoulder and smoke as she lay in her cot.
▪ Gandhi lay on a white cot in the prison yard under a spreading mango tree.
▪ I lie clueless in the cot until - until when?
▪ So each night was full of expectations as I lay on my cot.
▪ Feeling hopeful rather than confident, Kirov lay back on his cot and fell into a deep sleep.
▪ You stumbled over them in the living room in the mornings; they lay on canvas cots in the hall.
▪ Theresa left them to their business, and retired to sit beside the cot.
▪ I sat on my cot, playing cat's cradle with handcuffs, and kept quiet.
▪ He sat by Abigail's cot, not wanting to remember, but knowing that now he must.
▪ Now they slept with Timmy's cot wedged between the partition and his bed.
▪ Larry slept on a cot in grubby clothes but made it a point to shave every day.
▪ But at least the snapper was quiet, sleeping in its cot.
▪ Part of the mess were 2 dead medics who were sleeping on cots in the building.
▪ Let me tell you something about sleeping on a cot.
Cots were set up in the local high school for flood victims.
▪ After recovering from an attack of shallow breathing he recovered and one nurse said he was smiling and cooing in his cot.
▪ Children's playground; playroom; paddling pool; children's section of main pool; cots and high chairs.
▪ Gandhi lay on a white cot in the prison yard under a spreading mango tree.
▪ Grandfather clocks, davenport desks, cots, piano, mangle, even silhouettes in tiny oval frames.
▪ She plops down on the empty cot and lifts a curtain to peer out the window.
▪ The daughters slept in one bed, the parents in another, the son on a cot.
▪ Tlere was no way to keep the two cots curtained off; they were always being exposed to serve as sofas.
▪ Where stated a baby's cot can be supplied at a charge of £5 per week.
The Collaborative International Dictionary


Cot \Cot\ (k[o^]t), n. [OE. cot, cote, AS. cot, cote, cottage; akin to D. & Icel. kot, G. koth, kot, kothe. Cf. Coat.]

  1. A small house; a cottage or hut.

    The sheltered cot, the cultivated farm.

  2. A pen, coop, or like shelter for small domestic animals, as for sheep or pigeons; a cote.

  3. A cover or sheath; as, a roller cot (the clothing of a drawing roller in a spinning frame); a cot for a sore finger. See also finger cot.

  4. [Cf. Ir. cot.] A small, rudely-formed boat.

    Bell cot. (Arch.) See under Bell.


Cot \Cot\ (k[o^]t), n. [AS. cot cottage, bedchamber; or cf. OF. coite, F. couette (E. quilt), LL. cottum, cottus, mattress. See Cot a cottage.] A sleeping place of limited size; a little bed; a cradle; a piece of canvas extended by a frame, used as a bed. [Written also cott.]



Etymology 1 n. 1 (context US English) A simple bed, especially one for portable or temporary purposes; a camp bed. 2 (context nautical English) A wooden bed frame, slung by its corners from a beam, in which officers slept before the introduction of bunks. 3 A crib (child's bed). 4 A cover or sheath. 5 A finger cover used to prevent static discharge. 6 A small, crudely-formed boat. Etymology 2

n. 1 (context archaic English) A cottage or small homestead. 2 A pen, coop, or similar shelter for small domestic animals, such as sheep or pigeons; a cote.



A cot is a camp bed or infant bed.

Cot or COT may also refer to:

Cot (surname)

Cot is a surname which may refer to:

  • Jean-Pierre Cot (born 1937), French professor and judge
  • Pierre Cot (1895– 1977), French politician
  • Pierre Auguste Cot (1837–1883), French painter of the Academic Classicism school
Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary


"small bed," 1630s, from Hindi khat "couch, hammock," from Sanskrit khatva, probably from a Dravidian source (compare Tamil kattil "bedstead").


"hut, cottage;" see cote.



  1. n. a sheath worn to protect a finger [syn: fingerstall]

  2. baby bed with high sides [syn: crib]

  3. a small bed that folds up for storage or transport [syn: camp bed]

Usage examples of "cot".

Long he abode in that chamber looking at the arras, and wondering whether the sitter in the ivory throne would be any other than the thrall in the greenwood cot.

Everywhere they saw men and women working afield, but no houses of worthy yeomen or vavassors, or cots of good husbandmen.

A clothes airer stacked with damp washing, a pram and a bed were crammed up against a cot from which he swiftly averted his attention.

 The abbot greeted him politely and offered him an iron cot in a cell with a south exposure, after apologizing for the fact that the guest suite had been recently exposed to smallpox.

Me and Biel, least we got a solid cot below the hall, and enough food for us and the girls.

It was some hours later, when the recorder was playing loudly in the middle section, that he looked up to see Biset, this time, standing by his cot.

That is to say, the Biter has such things, cots for the officers, all comforts of the home.

His cot was in the third corner, while a fourth actually held a small light safe that Brye had clamped to the floor with special locks.

He was waking up on one of the narrow cots in a small room in the caravanserai on Maracanda, and peoplelive, solid peoplewere forcing their way in through the window.

After a few more minutes of unsuccessfully trying not to think of what lay in store for a celibate nun in a meat show, I trudged over to the Man of Many Colors, who was lying very still on one of the cots, while the Human Lizard and the India Rubber Man took turns rubbing his wrists vigorously and mopping sweat from his forehead.

Chen gestured with one arm, pointing at the opposite side of the room, which was filled with two rows of cots and reclining men.

Six narrow Army cots roughly three feet apart stood one end against the wall in a long line.

Three cots down, Aggie was tying her hair in rag curlers, using a mirror propped on her cross-legged lap.

Agreeing sounds of laughter came from the row of cots, not too loud and not too forceful.

Slowly they all moved toward their own Army cots, unsettled by this sudden intrusion of a stranger among them.