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Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

cop

I.noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a police/cop drama (=about the police)
▪ 'The Bill' is a popular police drama.
cop shop
traffic cop
undercover policeman/cop/agent etc
▪ undercover detectives
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
bad
▪ You know the good cop, bad cop thing?
▪ It was a good cop / bad cop routine.
▪ I got bad cop, bad cop.
▪ Holmgren played bad cop to the hilt.
▪ I got bad cop, bad cop.
▪ Others have gone free because their prosecutors relied on junk science, jailhouse snitches or bad cops.
▪ This meeting, he realized, was part of some kind of good cop, bad cop balancing act Giuliani was encouraging.
corrupt
▪ A strong likelihood of being fitted up by corrupt cops or being casually blasted out of existence by some one's assault rifle?
fair
▪ It's a fair cop - honest, officer!
▪ Do you want me to say that it's a fair cop or something?
▪ And criminals are warned that from then, they won't even have time to tell police it's a fair cop.
good
▪ You know the good cop, bad cop thing?
▪ It was a good cop / bad cop routine.
▪ This meeting, he realized, was part of some kind of good cop, bad cop balancing act Giuliani was encouraging.
local
▪ It wasn't likely that it was connected to the local cop shop.
▪ John Navarro, the local cop who tries to put the pieces together after Nelson disappears.
▪ If they were real, there'd be no local cops in Emmerdale.
▪ However, in New Hamsphire the time granted is up to the local cop who pulls you over.
tough
▪ She plans his trips, is the tough cop with him and his medicine and generally seems to brighten his life.
undercover
▪ But it's great fun watching these little monsters give undercover cop Arnie the run-around.
▪ People dived aside as undercover cops ambushed a post office raid.
■ NOUN
car
▪ He crossed the street, carrying the book bag by its drawstrings, heading for the parked cop car.
▪ The cop cars that cruised by irritated him.
▪ A cop car was already parked there.
shop
▪ Cop shop: Police have opened their own cop shop at Darlington police station to sell personal attack alarms and security devices.
▪ Phil, the square's resident bad egg, retrieved the battered lad from the cop shop.
▪ It wasn't likely that it was connected to the local cop shop.
▪ They've got her at Macclesfield cop shop.
show
▪ On cop shows, for instance, there's always a new case coming in, he said.
traffic
▪ Sasha says he donates about 100 roubles, or $ 3.50, a day to the traffic cops.
▪ Silicon Valley also is playing a major role in policing the Internet jam, like a traffic cop in downtown San Francisco.
▪ Tell that to Huseyin Ertan, a retired naval officer who is the Bosporus's chief traffic cop.
▪ As the reader might expect, I had my hands full acting like a traffic cop.
■ VERB
call
▪ I got Kevin to call in the cops, but they apparently couldn't find anything.
▪ Two nights ago, they called the cops, man.
▪ Another resident had complained, the two women got into a fight and Clarisa called the cops.
▪ And then the Boss would have to call the cops.
▪ He is so friendly, in fact, I want to call the cops.
▪ If he does, if he practices any philosophical trespass around here, I will call the cops.
kill
▪ When he discovers what's happened, he's forced to kill the cop as well.
▪ No one would expect him to enter a city where he had been arrested for killing a cop.
play
▪ He was playing a cop in Colors.
▪ Patsy Kensit plays a clairvoyant cop who sees in her mind bits and pieces of crimes before they are committed.
▪ Holmgren played bad cop to the hilt.
▪ The part of Reality is played by the cops and robbers, whose job it is to keep each other in business.
▪ The two play New York subway cops who also are foster brothers.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
it's a fair cop
▪ And criminals are warned that from then, they won't even have time to tell police it's a fair cop.
▪ Do you want me to say that it's a fair cop or something?
▪ It's a fair cop - honest, officer!
suicide by cop
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ a motorcycle cop
▪ There are more criminals out there than cops to chase them.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Holly Hunter is a San Francisco cop on the trail of a killer.
▪ I was a cop, once.
▪ If he's a skilled boardroom apparatchik, they say he's not much cop as a coach.
▪ It stars Erik Estrada, who first became famous as part of the gay motorcycle cop tandem on CHiPS.
▪ Nasty cop, nice cop: they were following procedure to the letter.
▪ Retired railroad cop and not a bad fellow for a cop.
▪ She knew the cops wouldn't just fine her.
▪ Somehow, the charm of seeing city streets swarm with uneducated, unemployable and unsupervised children is lost on the cops.
II.verb
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADVERB
out
▪ As it was, I copped out just a little.
▪ I only hat, e another year here and then I cop out!
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ Linda Vernon copped the grand prize this year with her new novel.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ As it was, I copped out just a little.
▪ I hope the others have been copped by the attendants.
▪ Mr Coffee will cop to the situation by engaging only the five basic universal appliance functions that every school child will know.
▪ With its packages yet to hit the street, Clarify figures its technology will cop the leadership position.
▪ You know, even with the beard and glasses they still copped the face in Caracas.
Wiktionary

cop

Etymology 1 n. (context obsolete English) A spider. Etymology 2

vb. 1 (context transitive formerly dialect now informal English) to obtain, to purchase (as in drugs), to get hold of, to take 2 (context transitive English) to (be forced to) take; to receive; to shoulder; to bear, especially blame or punishment for a particular instance of wrongdoing. 3 (context transitive English) to steal 4 (context transitive English) to adopt 5 (context intransitive usually with "to" slang English) to admit, especially to a crime. Etymology 3

n. (context slang law enforcement English) A police officer or prison guard. Etymology 4

n. 1 (context crafts English) The ball of thread wound on to the spindle in a spinning machine. 2 (context obsolete English) The top, summit, especially of a hill. 3 (context obsolete English) The head. 4 A tube or quill upon which silk is wound. 5 (context architecture military English) A merlon.

Wikipedia

Cop (album)

Cop is the second studio album by American experimental Rock band Swans. It was released in 1984, through record label K.422.

Cop (film)

Cop is a 1988 film starring James Woods and Lesley Ann Warren. It is based on the book Blood on the Moon by James Ellroy. The screenplay was written by James B. Harris, who also directs. Harris and Woods co-produced the film.

Cop

A cop is slang for a police officer.

Cop, Cops, COP, or COPS may also refer to:

The Collaborative International Dictionary

Cop

Cop \Cop\ (k[o^]p), n. [AS. cop; cf. G. kopf head. Cf. Cup, Cob.]

  1. The top of a thing; the head; a crest. [Obs.]

    Cop they used to call The tops of many hills.
    --Drayton.

  2. A conical or conical-ended mass of coiled thread, yarn, or roving, wound upon a spindle, etc.

  3. A tube or quill upon which silk is wound.

  4. (Mil. Arch.) Same as Merlon.

  5. A policeman. [Slang]

    Cop waste, a kind of cotton waste, composed chiefly of remnants of cops from which the greater part of the yarn has been unwound.

WordNet

cop

  1. n. uncomplimentary terms for a policeman [syn: bull, copper, fuzz, pig]

  2. [also: copping, copped]

cop

  1. v. take by theft; "Someone snitched my wallet!" [syn: hook, snitch, thieve, knock off, glom]

  2. take into custody; "the police nabbed the suspected criminals" [syn: collar, nail, apprehend, arrest, pick up, nab]

  3. [also: copping, copped]

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary

cop

1704, northern British dialect, "to seize, to catch," perhaps ultimately from Middle French caper "seize, to take," from Latin capere "to take" (see capable); or from Dutch kapen "to take," from Old Frisian capia "to buy," which is related to Old English ceapian (see cheap). Related: Copped; copping.

cop

"policeman," 1859, abbreviation of earlier copper (n.2), 1846, from cop (v.).

Usage examples of "cop".

Maybe somebody posted it on their intranet just as a convenience to their own employees, never realizing that it made the information available to everyone on the Internet who has access to a good search engine such as Google -including the just-plain-curious, the wannabe cop, the hacker, and the organized crime boss.

The veteran cop saw it coming and rolled out of the way as though he were an agile young man, barely avoiding the blow.

Rome in the backseat of a dark blue Alfa Romeo with the top cop of Gruppo Cardinale sitting next to him.

Fifteen minutes later he was being whisked across Rome in the backseat of a dark blue Alfa Romeo with the top cop of Gruppo Cardinale sitting next to him.

Something in the slurry of Carbuncle grist would not let the algorithmic security cops that patrolled the virtuality do their job here and keep the programming from intermingling with its surroundings however it so chose.

Every homosexual is a latent heterosexual, every authoritarian cop is the shell over an anarchistic libido.

Al Bayse, computer technician for the FBI, had been the only cop at the CPSR Roundtable, dragged there with his arm bent by Dorothy Denning.

If a cop is biased, sooner or later that bias is going to come out on the job, is what reporters say.

Sachs the street cop with wire thoroughly enjoyed hearing the vicious bigot squeal like a pig as she sprayed him again.

The cop stared at them blankly as Cade backed the Lexus out of its space and shot toward the back exit.

Psi is easier, and the cops will be welcome to use all the psi technique they can dig up: telepathy, clairvoyance, hexing, prekenners.

That little halt, however, gave Cleer a chance to talk to a traffic cop.

Fallon stopped, huffing and puffing, watching through the wide door as cops combed through the stuff in the cluttered workshop.

She sent out cop pies to all the African travel specialists around the world, from Tokyo to copen aagen.

Nobody in the cop business whispered, and the house had ignited with noise as soon as Crick gave the order for the invasion of techs.